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The BELGIAN ANESTHESIA TRAINEES (BAT) is an independent organisation that represents the interests of the Belgian anesthesia trainees in different institutions on different levels. All BAT members act voluntarily and without financial compensation to improve the position of Belgian anesthesia trainees by elaborating the BAT vision points and adhering to the BAT aims.

Effects of digital learning in anaesthesiology: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Background: Digital methods of instruction have proven to be effective in assisting learning in many fields at various levels. However, none of the meta-analyses have studied the effects of digital learning vs. traditional learning in the field of anaesthesiology.

Objective: We conducted a meta-analysis to review the role of digital learning in anaesthesiology by comparing the effect sizes of the involved studies.

Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics

Difficult intubation has been classified into four grades, according to the view obtainable at laryngoscopy. Frequency analysis suggests that, in obstetrics, the main cause of trouble is grade 3, in which the epiglottis can be seen, but not the cords. This group is fairly rare so that a proportion of anaesthetists will not meet the problem in their first few years and may thus be unprepared for it in obstetrics. However the problem can be simulated in routine anaesthesia, so that a drill for managing it can be practised.

Spinal anesthesia for ambulatory surgery: current controversies and concerns

Purpose of review: General anesthesia is a popular choice for ambulatory surgery. Spinal anesthesia is often avoided because of perceived delays due to time required to administer it and prolonged onset, as well as concerns of delayed offset, which may delay recovery and discharge home. However, the reports of improved outcomes in hospitalized patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty have renewed the interest in spinal anesthesia. This review article critically assesses the role of spinal anesthesia in comparison with fast-track general anesthesia for the outpatient setting.

Preoperative sedentary behavior is neither a risk factor for perioperative neurocognitive disorders nor associated with an increase in peripheral inflammation, a prospective observational cohort study

Background Surgical interventions result in a postoperative rise in circulating inflammatory cytokines and high molecular group box protein 1 (HMGB1). Herein, the impact of a sedentary lifestyle and other age-related factors on the development of perioperative neurocognitive disorders (PND) following non-cardiac surgical procedures was assessed in an older (55–75 years-old) surgical population.

Peripheral nerve blockade and novel analgesic modalities for ambulatory anesthesia

Purpose of review: Despite peripheral nerve blockade offering analgesic benefits and improving patient satisfaction, it has not been well adopted in ambulatory anesthesia. In this review, we aim to summarize the evidence underlying peripheral nerve blockade, local anesthetic adjuncts, continuous peripheral nerve blockade and novel analgesic modalities, with the objective to provide recommendations on postoperative analgesia optimization after peripheral nerve blockade in an ambulatory setting.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prone position in the operating room or in the intensive care unit: a systematic review

The prone position is commonly used in certain surgical procedures and to improve oxygenation in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Cardiorespiratory Arrest (CRA) in this position may be more challenging to treat because care providers trained in conventional CPR may not be familiar with CPR in the prone position.

Double standard: why electrocardiogram is standard care while electroencephalogram is not?

Purpose of review Major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) significantly affect the surgical outcomes. Electrocardiogram (ECG) has been a standard intraoperative monitor for 30 years. Electroencephalogram (EEG) can provide valuable information about the anesthetized state and guide anesthesia management during surgery. Whether EEG should be a standard intraoperative monitor is discussed in this review.

Belgian Anesthesia Trainees vzw/asbl
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